My name is Cate, I am 16 and from Ohio
Reblogged from thebooker  96 notes

allinablur:

literature meme — six prose writers [2/6]

Joanne Rowling aka J.K. Rowling

Joanne “Jo” Rowling (born 31 July 1965), pen names J. K. Rowlingand Robert Galbraith, is a British novelist, best known as the author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. The Potter books have gained worldwide attention, won multiple awards, and sold more than 400 million copies.They have become the best-selling book series in history,and been the basis for a series of films which has become the highest-grossing film series in history.Rowling had overall approval on the scriptsand maintained creative control by serving as a producer on the final instalment.

Born in Yate, Gloucestershire, Rowling was working as a researcher and bilingual secretary for Amnesty International when she conceived the idea for the Harry Potter series on a delayed train from Manchester to London in 1990.The seven-year period that followed entailed the death of her mother, divorce from her first husband and poverty until Rowling finished the first novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (1997). Rowling subsequently published 6 sequels—the last, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007)—as well as 3 supplements to the series. Since, Rowling has parted with her agency and resumed writing for adult readership, releasing the tragicomedy The Casual Vacancy (2012) and—using the pseudonym Robert Galbraith—the crime fiction novel The Cuckoo’s Calling (2013), the first of a series. [x]

The Harry Potter novels fall within the genre of fantasy literature; however, in many respects they are also bildungsromans, or coming of age novels, and contain elements of mystery, adventure, thriller, and romance. They can be considered part of the British children’s boarding school genre, which includes Rudyard Kipling’s Stalky & Co., Enid Blyton’s Malory Towers, St. Clare’s and the Naughtiest Girl series, and Frank Richards’s Billy Bunter novels: the Harry Potter books are predominantly set in Hogwarts, a fictional British boarding school for wizards, where the curriculum includes the use of magic. In this sense they are “in a direct line of descent from Thomas Hughes’s Tom Brown’s School Days and other Victorian and Edwardian novels of British public school life”. They are also, in the words of Stephen King, “shrewd mystery tales”, and each book is constructed in the manner of a Sherlock Holmes-style mystery adventure. The stories are told from a third person limited point of view with very few exceptions (such as the opening chapters of Philosopher’s Stone, Goblet of Fire and Deathly Hallows and the first two chapters of Half-Blood Prince). [x]